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BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 May 10;20(1):207. doi: 10.1186/s12891-019-2580-6.

Height loss but not body composition is related to low back pain in community-dwelling elderlies: Shimane CoHRE study.

Author information

1
Division of Internal Medicine, Unnan City Hospital, Unnan-city, Shimane, Japan.
2
Center for Community-Based Healthcare Research and Education (CoHRE), Shimane University, Matsue-city, Shimane, Japan.
3
Department of General Medicine, Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Izumo-city, Shimane, Japan.
4
Shimane University Faculty of Human Sciences, Matsue-city, Shimane, Japan.
5
Department of Functional Pathology, Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Izumo-city, Shimane, Japan.
6
Center for Community-Based Healthcare Research and Education (CoHRE), Shimane University, Matsue-city, Shimane, Japan. syano@med.shimane-u.ac.jp.
7
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Izumo-city, Shimane, Japan. syano@med.shimane-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint in the elderly Japanese population. Although previous studies showed that height loss was associated with LBP, it remains unclear whether LBP is associated with body composition. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether body composition and physical characteristics, including height loss, were associated with LBP.

METHODS:

The present study is retrospectively registered, and the participants were 2212 community-dwelling Japanese people aged over 60 years who participated in the Shimane CoHRE study in 2016. We investigated the presence of LBP, body composition parameters (muscle, fat, body weight, and bone mass), physical characteristics (body height and height loss), chronic diseases, history of fall, smoking, and drinking habits. We examined the relationships of body composition parameters and physical characteristics with point prevalence of LBP using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

The point prevalence of LBP was 43.2% in women and 39.5% in men. Logistic regression models showed that body height and body composition were not significantly associated with LBP; however, height loss was associated significantly with LBP in women and men (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.08-1.20 and OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06-1.21, respectively). Hypertension (OR: 1.32, 9 5% CI: 1.04-1.69) and chronic heart disease (OR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.01-2.43) in women and history of fall (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-2.56) and cerebrovascular disease (OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.05-3.34) in men were significantly associated with LBP. However, body composition was not associated with LBP in either gender.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study demonstrated that height loss, but not body composition, was related to LBP in community-dwelling elderly people. To elucidate the cause of LBP, it is important to consider the relationship with height loss.

KEYWORDS:

Geriatrics; Health examination; Lumbago; Muscle mass

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