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Curr Opin Immunol. 2019 May 6;59:79-87. doi: 10.1016/j.coi.2019.03.007. [Epub ahead of print]

NextGen cell-based immunotherapies in cancer and other immune disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, San Francisco, CA, USA; Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
UCSF Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, San Francisco, CA, USA; Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, CA, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: Kole.Roybal@ucsf.edu.
4
Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, San Francisco, CA, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; UCSF Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: Jeff.bluestone@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

T lymphocyte and other cell therapies have the potential to transform how we treat cancers and other diseases that have few therapeutic options. Here, we review the current progress in engineered T cell therapies and look to the future of what will establish cell therapy as the next pillar of medicine. The tools of synthetic biology along with fundamental knowledge in cell biology and immunology have enabled the development of approaches to engineer cells with enhanced capacity to recognize and treat disease safely and effectively. This along with new modes of engineering cells with CRISPR and strategies to make universal 'off-the-shelf' cell therapies will provide more rapid, flexible, and cheaper translation to the clinic.

PMID:
31071513
DOI:
10.1016/j.coi.2019.03.007

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