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Sleep. 2019 Aug 1;42(8). pii: zsz111. doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsz111.

Depressive symptoms, sleep patterns, and physical activity in adolescents with narcolepsy.

Author information

1
Division of Respiratory Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Psychiatry, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Division of Adolescent Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Division of Neurology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Department of Medicine, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Work Performed: The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the association between depressive symptoms, sleep patterns (duration and quality), excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), and physical activity (PA) in adolescents with narcolepsy.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study included adolescents (ages 10-18 years) with narcolepsy attending a tertiary care facility (The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada). Adolescents with narcolepsy completed questionnaires evaluating depressive symptoms (Children's Depression Inventory-2nd edition [CDI-2]), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), EDS (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and PA (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire). Wrist-based actigraphy was worn by adolescents for 1 week to measure total sleep time (over 24 hr) and sleep efficiency percentage.

RESULTS:

Thirty adolescents with narcolepsy (mean age = 13.8 ± 2.2 years, 76.7% male) participated. In this cohort of adolescents with narcolepsy, 23.3% had CDI-2 total scores in the elevated range. Greater CDI-2 total scores were associated with poor sleep quality (ρ = 0.571; p = 0.02), EDS (ρ = 0.360; p = 0.05), and lower self-reported PA levels (ρ = -0.512; p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Adolescents with narcolepsy report experiencing depressive symptoms, which are associated with poor sleep quality, EDS, and low PA levels. Strategies to improve nocturnal sleep quality and symptoms of EDS as well as promoting increased PA levels in adolescents with narcolepsy may provide an opportunity to improve depressive symptoms in this population. Multidisciplinary care with mental health and sleep specialists for adolescents with narcolepsy is needed.

KEYWORDS:

narcolepsy; actigraphy; adolescents; depressive symptoms; physical activity

PMID:
31070768
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsz111

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