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Cancer Causes Control. 2019 Aug;30(8):799-811. doi: 10.1007/s10552-019-01177-z. Epub 2019 May 8.

Proceedings of the fourth international molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) meeting.

Author information

1
Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, 250 Williams Street NW, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. peter.campbell@cancer.org.
2
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, USA.
3
Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Ave, Room SM1036, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
8
Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Oncology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.
9
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
10
Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Broad Institute of Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA.
12
Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
14
Sema4, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, Genetics & Genomic Sciences and Pathology, Branford, CT, USA.
15
Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.
16
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
17
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
18
Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
19
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
20
Department of Epidemiology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
21
Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
22
Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 450 Brookline Ave, Room SM1036, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. Shuji_ogino@dfci.harvard.edu.
23
Broad Institute of Harvard & MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. Shuji_ogino@dfci.harvard.edu.
24
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Shuji_ogino@dfci.harvard.edu.
25
Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. Shuji_ogino@dfci.harvard.edu.

Abstract

An important premise of epidemiology is that individuals with the same disease share similar underlying etiologies and clinical outcomes. In the past few decades, our knowledge of disease pathogenesis has improved, and disease classification systems have evolved to the point where no complex disease processes are considered homogenous. As a result, pathology and epidemiology have been integrated into the single, unified field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE). Advancing integrative molecular and population-level health sciences and addressing the unique research challenges specific to the field of MPE necessitates assembling experts in diverse fields, including epidemiology, pathology, biostatistics, computational biology, bioinformatics, genomics, immunology, and nutritional and environmental sciences. Integrating these seemingly divergent fields can lead to a greater understanding of pathogenic processes. The International MPE Meeting Series fosters discussion that addresses the specific research questions and challenges in this emerging field. The purpose of the meeting series is to: discuss novel methods to integrate pathology and epidemiology; discuss studies that provide pathogenic insights into population impact; and educate next-generation scientists. Herein, we share the proceedings of the Fourth International MPE Meeting, held in Boston, MA, USA, on 30 May-1 June, 2018. Major themes of this meeting included 'integrated genetic and molecular pathologic epidemiology', 'immunology-MPE', and 'novel disease phenotyping'. The key priority areas for future research identified by meeting attendees included integration of tumor immunology and cancer disparities into epidemiologic studies, further collaboration between computational and population-level scientists to gain new insight on exposure-disease associations, and future pooling projects of studies with comparable data.

KEYWORDS:

Meeting proceedings; Meeting report; Meeting summary; Molecular pathological epidemiology; Patho-epidemiology

PMID:
31069578
PMCID:
PMC6614001
[Available on 2020-08-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-019-01177-z

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