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Osteoporos Int. 2019 May 8. doi: 10.1007/s00198-019-05000-y. [Epub ahead of print]

Longitudinal assessment of health-related quality of life in osteoporosis: data from the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

Author information

1
Kingston General Health Research Institute, Kingston Health Sciences Centre, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. wilma.hopman@kingstonhsc.ca.
2
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. wilma.hopman@kingstonhsc.ca.
3
Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
5
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
6
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
7
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
8
McCaig Institute for Bone & Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
9
Department of Medicine/Endocrinology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

Little is known about the association between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and osteoporosis in the absence of fracture, and how HRQOL may change over time. This study provides evidence of substantially reduced HRQOL in women and men with self-reported and/or BMD-confirmed osteoporosis, even in the absence of fragility fracture.

INTRODUCTION:

Fragility fractures have a detrimental effect on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of those with osteoporosis. Less is known about the association between HRQOL and osteoporosis in the absence of fracture.

METHODS:

Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study participants completed the SF-36, a detailed health questionnaire and measures of bone mineral density (BMD) at baseline and follow-up. We report the results of participants ≥ 50 years with 10-year follow-up. Self-reported osteoporosis at baseline and BMD-based osteoporosis at follow-up were ascertained. Multivariable linear regression models were developed for baseline SF-36 domains, component summaries, and change over time, adjusting for relevant baseline information.

RESULTS:

Baseline data were available for 5266 women and 2112 men. Women in the osteoporosis group had substantially lower SF-36 baseline scores, particularly in the physically oriented domains, than those without osteoporosis. A similar but attenuated pattern was evident for the men. After 10-year follow-up (2797 women and 1023 men), most domain scores dropped for women and men regardless of osteoporosis status, with the exception of mentally-oriented ones. In general, a fragility fracture was associated with lower SF-36 scores and larger declines over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides evidence of substantially reduced HRQOL in women and men with self-reported and/or BMD-confirmed osteoporosis, even in the absence of fragility fracture. HRQOL should be thoroughly investigated even prior to fracture, to develop appropriate interventions for all stages of the disease.

KEYWORDS:

CaMos; Fracture; Longitudinal; Osteoporosis; Population-based; Quality of life; SF-36

PMID:
31069440
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-019-05000-y

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