Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nephron. 2019 May 8:1-7. doi: 10.1159/000499344. [Epub ahead of print]

Comparison of Salt Intake in Children to that of their Parents.

Author information

1
Center for the Research and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk, Hospital Senhora da Oliveira, Guimarães, Portugal, jorgecotter@gmail.com.
2
Life and Health Sciences Research Institute, School of Medicine, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, jorgecotter@gmail.com.
3
ICVS/3B's, PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal, jorgecotter@gmail.com.
4
E.B.2,3 João de Meira School Teacher, Biologist, Master in Environmental Education, Guimarães, Portugal.
5
EPIUnit, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
6
Center for the Research and Treatment of Arterial Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk, Hospital Senhora da Oliveira, Guimarães, Portugal.
7
Life and Health Sciences Research Institute, School of Medicine, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal.
8
ICVS/3B's, PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães, Portugal.
9
Department of Medicine and CINTESIS, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High salt intake has been related to increased blood pressure and cardiovascular events. Few studies evaluated daily salt consumption in children.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare urinary sodium (UNa) excretion in children to that of their parents using the gold standard of 24-h collections.

METHODS:

We prospectively collected 633 urine samples, mean UNa = 133 ± 37 mmol/day (7.7 ± 2.1 g of salt) from 326 children aged 10-15 years and 94 urine samples, mean UNa = 136 ± 45 mmol/day (8.0 ± 2.6 g of salt), from 78 parents. Comparisons between sodium intake were made by analysis of variance.

RESULTS:

We paired 24-h urine samples of 65 children, UNa = 134 ± 36 mmol/day, (7.9 ± 2.3 g of salt) to 75 corresponding parents, UNa = 136 ± 45 mmol/day (8.0 ± 2.6 g of salt). Within parents, 50 were mothers, UNa = 138 ± 49 mmol/day (8.1 ± 2.9 g of salt) and 25 were fathers, UNa = 116 ± 41 mmol/day (6.8 ± 2.4 g of salt). Sodium excretion did not differ between boys vs. girls and mothers vs. fathers. Salt intake of children was not different from that of mothers (n = 50; 7.9 ± 2.3 vs. 8.1 ± 2. 8 g/24 h, p = 0.515) but higher than that of fathers (n = 25; 8.0 ± 2.3 vs. 6.8 ± 2.4 g/24 h, p < 0.05). Only 9.2% of children and 30.8% of the parents had a salt intake below 5 g/24 h. Around 60% of the children had a salt intake higher than their parents. Parental educational level was not associated with differences in salt consumption in children and parents. Overall, parents and children UNa excretion showed a moderate positive and significant correlation (r = 0.45, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

In 91% of children aged 10-15 years, daily salt intake was higher than recommended. Also, children's salt consumption was closer to that of their mothers than that of their fathers, -possibly because of closeness in dietary habits with their mothers.

KEYWORDS:

24-h urine sampling; Children; Dietary salt; Parents; Portugal

PMID:
31067552
DOI:
10.1159/000499344

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for S. Karger AG, Basel, Switzerland
Loading ...
Support Center