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Cell Rep. 2019 May 7;27(6):1657-1665.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.04.036.

CYLD Regulates Centriolar Satellites Proteostasis by Counteracting the E3 Ligase MIB1.

Author information

1
CRCINA, Team SOAP, INSERM, CNRS, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, IRS-UN blg, Room 405, 8 quai Moncousu, 44007 Nantes, France.
2
CRCINA, Team SOAP, INSERM, CNRS, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, IRS-UN blg, Room 405, 8 quai Moncousu, 44007 Nantes, France; Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest, Site René Gauducheau, Saint-Herblain, France.
3
CRCINA, Team SOAP, INSERM, CNRS, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, IRS-UN blg, Room 405, 8 quai Moncousu, 44007 Nantes, France. Electronic address: nicolas.bidere@inserm.fr.

Abstract

The tumor suppressor CYLD is a deubiquitinating enzyme that removes non-degradative ubiquitin linkages bound to a variety of signal transduction adaptors. CYLD participates in the formation of primary cilia, a microtubule-based structure that protrudes from the cell body to act as a "sensing antenna." Yet, how exactly CYLD regulates ciliogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we conducted an unbiased proteomic screen of CYLD binding partners and identified components of the centriolar satellites. These small granular structures, tethered to the scaffold protein pericentriolar matrix protein 1 (PCM1), gravitate toward the centrosome and orchestrate ciliogenesis. CYLD knockdown promotes PCM1 degradation and the subsequent dismantling of the centriolar satellites. We found that CYLD marshals the centriolar satellites by deubiquitinating and preventing the E3 ligase Mindbomb 1 (MIB1) from marking PCM1 for proteasomal degradation. These results link CYLD to the regulation of centriolar satellites proteostasis and provide insight into how reversible ubiquitination finely tunes ciliogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

CYLD; MIB1; PCM1; centriolar satellites; ciliogenesis; proteostasis; ubiquitin

PMID:
31067453
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2019.04.036
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