Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2019 Oct;47(10):1723-1734. doi: 10.1007/s10802-019-00554-1.

Suicide Attempts and Course of Suicidal Ideation among Puerto Rican Early Adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, Room 611HN, New York, NY, 10065, USA.
2
Division of Gender, Sexuality and Health, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 15, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Belfer Building, Room 1303, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA.
4
The Graduate Center, City University of New York, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA.
5
Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, Office A928 9th Floor, Rio Piedras, PR, 00935, USA.
6
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 43, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
7
Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 43, New York, NY, 10032, USA. cristiane.duarte@nyspi.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Suicidal behavior increases substantially during early adolescence, a critical understudied developmental period. This study reports on the prevalence of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and course of suicidal ideation among Puerto Rican early adolescents, a high-risk group for suicidal behavior in adulthood. Gender differences and the prospective association of psychiatric disorders with course of suicidal ideation are examined. Participants were 1228 Puerto Rican adolescents (ages 10-13 at wave 1; 48% female) and parents, selected through probability-based sampling, assessed yearly across three waves. Adolescents and parents reported via Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV about 12-month suicide attempts and suicidal ideation (further categorized as never present, onset, recurrence, and remission), mood and anxiety disorders; parents reported on disruptive disorders. Over the three waves, 9.5% early adolescents thought about suicide and 2.1% attempted suicide. In adjusted multinomial regression models, compared to those with never present suicidal ideation, female gender was related to onset of suicidal ideation (OR = 2.60; 95% CI, 1.22-5.55). Disruptive disorders were related to onset (OR = 5.80; 95% CI, 2.06-16.32) and recurrence of suicidal ideation (OR = 5.07, 95% CI, 1.14-22.47), mood disorders were related to remission (OR = 14.42, 95% CI, 3.90-53.23), and anxiety disorders to onset of suicidal ideation (OR = 3.68, 95% CI, 1.75-7.73). Our findings inform strategies tailored for early adolescents. To address onset of suicidal ideation, prevention should focus on girls and those with anxiety or disruptive disorders. When ideation is recurrent, interventions oriented to reduce disruptive behavior and its consequences may help achieve remission.

KEYWORDS:

Developmental psychopathology; Early adolescence; Longitudinal studies; Suicidal ideation; Suicide attempts

PMID:
31065859
DOI:
10.1007/s10802-019-00554-1

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center