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Pediatr Nephrol. 2019 May 7. doi: 10.1007/s00467-019-04259-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Advances in our understanding of genetic kidney disease using kidney organoids.

Little MH1,2,3, Quinlan C4,5,6.

Author information

1
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Flemington Rd., Parkville, VIC, Australia. melissa.little@mcri.edu.au.
2
Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. melissa.little@mcri.edu.au.
3
Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. melissa.little@mcri.edu.au.
4
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Flemington Rd., Parkville, VIC, Australia.
5
Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
6
Department of Nephrology, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Rd., Parkville, VIC, Australia.

Abstract

A significant proportion of kidney disease presenting in childhood is likely genetic in origin with a growing number of genes implicated in its development. However, many children may have changes in previously undescribed or unrecognised genes. The recent development of methods for generating human kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells has the potential to substantially change the rate of diagnosis and the development of new treatments for some forms of genetic kidney disease. In this review, we discuss how accurately a kidney organoid models the human kidney, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of these potentially patient-derived models of renal disease.

KEYWORDS:

Kidney development; Metanephros; Organoids; Pluripotent stem cell; Reporter line

PMID:
31065797
DOI:
10.1007/s00467-019-04259-x

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