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Patient Educ Couns. 2019 Apr 30. pii: S0738-3991(19)30168-5. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2019.04.029. [Epub ahead of print]

Development and pilot-testing of a colorectal cancer screening decision aid for individuals with varying health literacy levels.

Author information

1
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Public Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: a.j.woudstra@amc.uva.nl.
2
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Psychology, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
4
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Medical Informatics, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
5
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Department of Public Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
6
Psychosocial Research Group, Prince of Wales Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Lowy Research Centre, UNSW Sydney, NSW, Australia.
7
Wiser Healthcare, Sydney School of Public health, The University of Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia; Sydney Health Literacy Lab, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Making an informed decision about colorectal cancer screening requires health literacy. Our aim was to develop and pilot-test a computer-based decision aid to support informed decision making about whether or not to participate in colorectal cancer screening for individuals with varying health literacy levels in the Netherlands.

METHODS:

First, we designed and adapted the decision aid prototype among 25 individuals with low (n = 10) and adequate (n = 15) health literacy. Second, we used a before/after study to assess changes in knowledge, attitude, intention, decisional conflict, deliberation, anxiety and risk perception in an online survey among 81 individuals eligible for colorectal cancer screening with low (n = 35) and adequate (n = 46) health literacy.

RESULTS:

The decision aid was acceptable, comprehensible, reduced decisional conflict, increased deliberation and improved knowledge about colorectal cancer screening, but not about colorectal cancer, among individuals with adequate and low health literacy. Usability was slightly higher for participants with adequate health literacy compared to those with low health literacy.

CONCLUSION:

The decision aid is promising in supporting informed decision making about colorectal cancer screening, also among individuals with lower health literacy.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Further refinement of interactive features, such as videos, animations and the values clarification exercise, is needed to increase the usability of the decision aid.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer screening; Computer-based; Decision aid; Health literacy; Informed decision making

PMID:
31064682
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2019.04.029

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