Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 May 7;16(1):41. doi: 10.1186/s12966-019-0802-9.

Specific physical activities, sedentary behaviours and sleep as long-term predictors of accelerometer-measured physical activity in 91,648 adults: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Room 301D 3/F, Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.
2
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK.
3
School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Room 301D 3/F, Jockey Club Building for Interdisciplinary Research, 5 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. Soren.Brage@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The evidence for the prospective relationships between specific physical activities (PA), sedentary behaviours (SB) and sleep on subsequent total PA levels is scarce. The purpose of this study was to examine prospective associations of self-reported PA, SB and sleep, and changes in these with subsequent accelerometer-measured PA.

METHODS:

A sub-sample of 91,648 UK Biobank participants reported moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), lifestyle activities, TV viewing, computer use and sleep through screen-based questionnaires at baseline (2006-2010), and provided valid accelerometry data (dominant wrist-worn for 7 days between 2013 and 2015). A further sub-sample of 7709 participants repeated the screen-based questionnaires between 2012 and 2013.

RESULTS:

In both women (n = 51,545) and men (n = 40,103), positive associations were observed between all self-reported measures of PA at baseline (MVPA, lifestyle/job-related activities, active transporting modes) and accelerometer-measured PA levels at follow-up (median 5.7 years); an exception was 'walking/standing at work' in women. Sedentary time at work, TV viewing and computer use were inversely associated with PA at follow-up. Sleeping either more or less than 7 h/day at baseline was associated with lower PA at follow-up (except for ≤6 h/day in men). In the repeat self-report sub-sample (median 4.3 years), relatively higher physical activity at follow-up was observed in those who maintained or achieved favourable levels of MVPA, walking for pleasure, strenuous sports, other exercises, heavy DIY (in women), heavy physical work, and walking/standing at work (in women), sedentary time at work, getting about methods (in women), commuting methods (in women), TV viewing, computer use or sleep.

CONCLUSIONS:

Initial levels of PA, SB and sleep, and changes in these variables were generally associated with subsequent accelerometer-measured PA in the expected directions, suggesting these specific behaviours all contribute to the total volume of physical activity over time and could thus be targets for intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Accelerometry; Physical activity; Predictors; Sedentary behaviour; UK biobank

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center