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Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2019 Sep;16(5):483-485. doi: 10.1177/1479164119847481. Epub 2019 May 8.

Advanced glycation end product carboxymethyl-lysine and risk of incident peripheral artery disease in older adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study.

Author information

1
1 Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
2
2 Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
3 Kaiser Permanente of Georgia, Duluth, GA, USA.
4
4 Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
5 Department of Medicine, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA.
6
6 Division of Nephrology-Hypertension, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
7
7 Cardiology Section, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, San Francisco, CA, USA.
8
8 Departments of Medicine, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
9
9 Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA.
10
10 Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
11
11 New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
12
12 Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Carboxymethyl-lysine is an advanced glycation end product that is detectable in the serum. Higher carboxymethyl-lysine levels have been associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and cardiovascular mortality. We determined whether high carboxymethyl-lysine levels are also associated with the risk of peripheral artery disease in Cardiovascular Health Study participants who were all aged 65 years and older at baseline. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the association of baseline carboxymethyl-lysine levels with incident peripheral artery disease in 3267 individuals followed for a median length of 10.0 years. A total of 157 cases of incident peripheral artery disease occurred during follow-up. No significant relationship between carboxymethyl-lysine and risk of peripheral artery disease was found (hazard ratio per standard deviation increment = 1.03; 95% confidence interval = 0.87, 1.23).

KEYWORDS:

Advanced glycation end products; ankle–brachial index; inflammation; peripheral artery disease

PMID:
31064218
PMCID:
PMC6697602
[Available on 2020-09-01]
DOI:
10.1177/1479164119847481

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