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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Apr 25;123:43-46. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.04.033. [Epub ahead of print]

Sense of smell and quality of life in children with diabetes mellitus.

Author information

1
Ankara University, Ankara Medical Faculty, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Ankara, Turkey; Health Science University, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Research and Training Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: dryasinyilmaz@gmail.com.
2
Health Science University, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Research and Training Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Health Science University, Prof. Dr. Ilhan Varank Sancaktepe Research and Training Hospital, Department of Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey.
4
University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Smell and Taste Center, Philadelphia, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic systemic diseases seen in children. The increasing prevalence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) among children is alarming. Although olfaction has been found to be altered in some adult T1DM subjects, it is unknown whether this is the case in children and, if so, whether the dysfunction adversely influences their quality of life (QOL).

METHODS:

Using the Pediatric Smell Wheel® (PSW), we measured the olfactory function of 30 T1DM patients and 30 healthy controls [mean ages = 13.1 & 13.0, respectively]. The Turkish version of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) was also administered.

RESULTS:

The PSW scores were lower in the T1DM patients than in the controls (9.17 vs 10.37; p < 0.0001), although, in both cases, the scores fell within the normal range for individuals of their age (i.e., at or above 80%). Interestingly, such scores were lower in left-handed than in right-handed patients (8.00 vs 9.46; p = 0.001). Lower QOL indices were also found for the T1DM than for the controls for the domains of Emotional Function (p = 0.02), Social Function (p = 0.014), School Function (p = 0.011), and Psychosocial Status (p = 0.002). No significant associations were evident between PSW scores and disease duration and QOL scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that modest decrements in smell function are evident in children with TIDM.

KEYWORDS:

Olfactory dysfunction; Pediatric smell wheel; PedsQL; Quality of life; Sense of smell; Type 1 diabetes mellitus

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