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Child Abuse Negl. 2019 Jul;93:66-78. doi: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2019.04.008. Epub 2019 May 4.

Exploring parent sexuality profiles and links with the sexuality profiles of adolescents who have engaged in sexual abuse.

Author information

1
Université du Québec à Montréal, Department of Psychology, C.P. 8888, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; Université du Québec à Montréal, Department of Sexology, C.P. 8888, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; Centre de recherche, Institut Philippe-Pinel de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: goulet.jo-annie@uqam.ca.
2
Université du Québec à Montréal, Department of Psychology, C.P. 8888, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; Université du Québec à Montréal, Department of Sexology, C.P. 8888, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; Centre de recherche, Institut Philippe-Pinel de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Parents play an important role in children's development of sexual norms and behaviors. Regarding the family environment of adolescents who have engaged in sexual abuse (AESA), some studies have suggested potential factors of interest, although the sexuality of AESA parents has yet to be considered.

OBJECTIVES:

(1) Explore sexual profiles among parents, (2) Examine if the sexual profiles of parents are related to the sexual profiles of AESA.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING:

Participants include 201 parents (116 mothers, 85 fathers) of AESA recruited from specialized treatment and youth centers in Quebec.

METHODS:

Hierarchical and nonhierarchical methods were used to generate cluster solutions. Chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were then conducted to explore links between parents' and AESA sexuality profiles.

RESULTS:

Three sexuality profiles emerged separately for mothers and fathers, showing similar patterns. Parents in the first two clusters (Overinvested and Atypical Sexuality - OAS and Overinvested and Non-Atypical Sexuality - ONAS) showed greater interest/investment in sexuality and an earlier sexual onset. However, they differed on their sexual interests: Most parents in the OAS cluster reported a greater variety of atypical fantasies and atypical sexual behaviors, while the sexual interests of parents in the ONAS cluster were mainly limited to non-atypical sexuality. Parents in the third cluster (Constrictive Sexuality - CS) were less interested and invested in sexuality. A link between the exacerbated sexuality of mothers (OAS cluster) and of adolescents was also found.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study represents a first step in showing a potential correspondence between parents' and AESA sexuality profiles.

KEYWORDS:

Juvenile sexual offending; Parents; Sexual attitudes; Sexual interest; Sexual profiles

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