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Dev Cell. 2019 May 6;49(3):375-391. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2019.04.012.

Metastasis Organotropism: Redefining the Congenial Soil.

Author information

1
Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
2
Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Lester and Sue Smith Breast Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; McNair Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: xiangz@bcm.edu.

Abstract

Metastasis is the most devastating stage of cancer progression and causes the majority of cancer-related deaths. Clinical observations suggest that most cancers metastasize to specific organs, a process known as "organotropism." Elucidating the underlying mechanisms may help identify targets and treatment strategies to benefit patients. This review summarizes recent findings on tumor-intrinsic properties and their interaction with unique features of host organs, which together determine organ-specific metastatic behaviors. Emerging insights related to the roles of metabolic changes, the immune landscapes of target organs, and variation in epithelial-mesenchymal transitions open avenues for future studies of metastasis organotropism.

KEYWORDS:

EMT; immune microenvironment; metabolism; metastasis; niche; organotropism; seed and soil

PMID:
31063756
PMCID:
PMC6506189
[Available on 2020-05-06]
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2019.04.012

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