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Curr Biol. 2019 May 6;29(9):R313-R314. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2019.03.053.

The mirror-based eyes of scallops demonstrate a light-evoked pupillary response.

Author information

1
University of South Carolina, Department of Biological Sciences, 715 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29205, USA.
2
Vision Group, Lund University, Biology building B, Sölvegatan 35, Lund, 223 62, Sweden.
3
University of South Carolina, Department of Biological Sciences, 715 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29205, USA. Electronic address: speiser@mailbox.sc.edu.

Abstract

Light levels in terrestrial and shallow-water environments can vary by ten orders of magnitude between clear days and overcast nights. Light-evoked pupillary responses help the eyes of animals perform optimally under these variable light conditions by balancing trade-offs between sensitivity and resolution [1]. Here, we document that the mirror-based eyes of the bay scallop Argopecten irradians and the sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus have pupils that constrict to ∼60% of their fully dilated areas within several minutes of light exposure. The eyes of scallops contain two separate retinas and our ray-tracing model indicates that, compared to eyes with fully constricted pupils, eyes from A. irradians with fully dilated pupils provide approximately three times the sensitivity and half the spatial resolution at the distal retina and five times the sensitivity and one third the spatial resolution at the proximal retina. We also identify radial and circular actin fibers associated with the corneas of A. irradians that may represent muscles whose contractions dilate and constrict the pupil, respectively.

PMID:
31063719
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2019.03.053

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