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Epidemiol Infect. 2019 Jan;147:e183. doi: 10.1017/S0950268819000694.

Analysis of influenza data generated by four epidemiological surveillance laboratories in Mexico, 2010-2016.

Author information

1
Laboratorio Central de Epidemiología,División de Laboratorios de Vigilancia e Investigación Epidemiológica,IMSS,Ciudad de México,Mexico.
2
Laboratorio de Genómica,Departamento de Genética y Genómica Humana,Instituto Nacional de Perinatología 'Isidro Espinosa de los Reyes',Ciudad de México,Mexico.
3
Departamento de Biología Molecular,Centro de Investigación Biomédica del Noreste IMSS,Monterrey, N.L.,Mexico.
4
Unidad de Investigación Médica Yucatán,Unidad Médica de Alta Especialidad,Centro Médico Nacional 'Ignacio García Téllez' IMSS,Mérida, Yucatán,Mexico.
5
Cátedra CONACyT, División de Investigación Quirúrgica,Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente IMSS,Guadalajara, Jal.,Mexico.
6
Laboratorio de Diagnóstico Molecular Departamento de Biología Molecular,Centro de Investigación Biomédica del Noreste IMSS,Monterrey, N.L.,Mexico.
7
División de Laboratorios de Vigilancia e Investigación Epidemiológica,IMSS,Ciudad de México,Mexico.

Abstract

The disease caused by the influenza virus is a global public health problem due to its high rates of morbidity and mortality. Thus, analysis of the information generated by epidemiological surveillance systems has vital importance for health decision making. A retrospective analysis was performed using data generated by the four molecular diagnostic laboratories of the Mexican Social Security Institute between 2010 and 2016. Demographics, influenza positivity, seasonality, treatment choices and vaccination status analyses were performed for the vaccine according to its composition for each season. In all cases, both the different influenza subtypes and different age groups were considered separately. The circulation of A/H1N1pdm09 (48.7%), influenza A/H3N2 (21.1%), influenza B (12.6%), influenza A not subtyped (11%) and influenza A/H1N1 (6.6%) exhibited well-defined annual seasonality between November and March, and there were significant increases in the number of cases every 2 years. An inadequate use of oseltamivir was determined in 38% of cases, and the vaccination status in general varied between 12.1 and 18.5% depending on the season. Our results provide current information about influenza in Mexico and demonstrate the need to update both operational case definitions and medical practice guidelines to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics and antivirals.

KEYWORDS:

Infectious disease epidemiology; influenza; molecular biology

PMID:
31063113
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268819000694

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