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J Pediatr. 2019 May 2. pii: S0022-3476(19)30303-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.03.016. [Epub ahead of print]

Test Accuracy of the Screening Tool for Early Predictors of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder for Post-injury Mental Health in a Managed-Medicaid Population.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Social Work, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.
2
Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis Children's Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.
3
The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH.
4
Telemedicine Department, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.
5
Center for Biostatistics, Department of Biomedical Informatics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.
6
The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH; Division of Emergency Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the Screening Tool for Early Predictors of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (STEPP) test accuracy in identifying children with new mental health diagnoses and psychotropic medications prescribed within 12 months after unintentional injuries in a managed-Medicaid population.

STUDY DESIGN:

We conducted a secondary analysis of a retrospective cohort that investigated mental health diagnoses and psychotropic medications pre- and post-injury in children ≤18 years of age treated at a pediatric trauma center from 2005 to 2015 (n = 2208). For this study, we analyzed children with STEPP scores from their injury admission (n = 85). For children without previous mental health diagnoses or psychotropic prescriptions, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the child and parent STEPP.

RESULTS:

Of 78 children without previous diagnoses, 12 had post-injury mental health diagnoses. Of 68 children without previous psychotropic medication use, 10 had psychotropic medications prescribed. The child STEPP sensitivity was 8.3% for mental health diagnoses (95% CI 0.2, 38.5) and 10% for psychotropic medications (95% CI 0.3, 44.5). The child STEPP specificity was 77.3% for mental health diagnoses (95% CI 65.3, 86.7) and 75.9% for psychotropic medication (95% CI 62.8, 86.1).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that the STEPP performed poorly in identifying children who received new mental health diagnoses and new psychotropic medications following injury.

KEYWORDS:

psychiatry; psychology; trauma

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