Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sleep Breath. 2019 May 2. doi: 10.1007/s11325-019-01848-w. [Epub ahead of print]

Validity of transit time-based blood pressure measurements in patients with and without heart failure or pulmonary arterial hypertension across different breathing maneuvers.

Author information

1
Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Department of Neurology with Institute for Translational Neurology, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
2
Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Department of Neurology with Institute for Translational Neurology, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany. jens.spiesshoefer@ukmuenster.de.
3
Institute of Medical Informatics, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
4
Department of Cardiology I, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
5
Department of Medicine A, Hematology, Oncology and Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Muenster, Muenster, Germany.
6
Cardiovascular Medicine Division, Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, National Research Council, CNR-Regione Toscana, Scuola Superiore San't Anna, Pisa, Italy.
7
Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Pulse transit time (PTT) derived by ECG and plethysmographic signal can be a promising alternative to invasive or oscillometry-based blood pressure (BP) monitoring in sleep laboratories because it does not cause arousals from sleep. Therefore, this study assessed the validity of PTT for BP monitoring under sleep laboratory-like conditions.

METHODS:

Ten volunteers (55.8 ± 19.6 years), 12 patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF; 67.3 ± 8.6 years), and 14 patients with Nizza class I pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; 59.5 ± 13.4 years) performed different breathing patterns to simulate nocturnal sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). BP was measured at least every 15 min over 1 h using oscillometry (Task Force Monitor™) and PTT (SOMNOscreen™) devices in free breathing conditions and during SDB simulation (alternating phases of hyperventilation and apneas).

RESULTS:

One hundred forty-two points of measurements were collected. No difference was found in both mean systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) between oscillometric PTT-based BP measurements in the whole population and throughout the whole recording (SBP 111.3 ± 15.1 mmHg versus 110.0 ± 14.7 mmHg, p = 0.051; DBP 69.9 ± 12.2 versus 69.9 ± 14.2 mmHg, p = 0.701). Likewise, no significant difference in SBP and DBP was found between the two methods in the subgroups of healthy subjects, HFrEF patients and PAH patients, both in free breathing conditions (p > 0.05) and during SDB simulation (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

When monitoring BP in healthy subjects, and in patients with HFrEF or PAH, PTT provides a BP estimation comparable with oscillometric measurement, though slightly inaccurate, both in the condition of regular and unstable breathing.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure monitoring; Heart failure; Pulse transit time; Sleep-disordered breathing

PMID:
31049851
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-019-01848-w

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center