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Anesthesiol Clin. 2019 Jun;37(2):361-372. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2019.01.008. Epub 2019 Mar 16.

Outcomes in Ambulatory Anesthesia: Measuring What Matters.

Author information

1
Society for Ambulatory Anesthesiology (SAMBA), ASA Committee on Performance and Outcome Measures, Surgery Center of Aventura, Envision Physician Services, 7700 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, FL 33322, USA. Electronic address: Leopoldo.Rodriguez@shcr.com.
2
Envision Physician Services, 7700 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, FL 33322, USA; Department of Anesthesiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, 550 E. Van Buren Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA; University College London, Centre for Perioperative Medicine Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, UCL 2nd Floor Charles Bell House, 43-45 Foley Street, London W1W 7TS, UK.
3
Envision Physician Services, 7700 West Sunrise Boulevard, Plantation, FL 33322, USA.

Abstract

Health care professionals see measurement through their own eyes and biases. This article makes the patient central to what is measured. Patient-reported experience measures and patient-reported outcome measures are of the utmost importance. In addition, as clinicians continue to evolve how they measure what really matters, they need to be mindful of the time taken from direct patient care to achieve these activities. In addition, and most important, clinicians must ensure that all measures are designed to ensure that population health is improved, that patient experience and outcomes are enhanced, and that the cost of care is reduced.

KEYWORDS:

MIPS; Measure; Outcome; Patient-reported experience measure (PREM); Patient-reported outcome measure (PROM); Performance; Quality Payment Program (QPP); Unintended consequences

PMID:
31047135
DOI:
10.1016/j.anclin.2019.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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