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Anesthesiol Clin. 2019 Jun;37(2):265-287. doi: 10.1016/j.anclin.2019.01.005. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Regional Anesthesia for Ambulatory Anesthesiologists.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida Jacksonville, 655 West 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL 32209, USA. Electronic address: alberto.ardon@jax.ufl.edu.
2
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Toronto, Women's College Hospital, Mc L 2-405, 399, Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8, Canada.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.
4
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC Box #3094, Stop #4, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

Proper pain control is critical for ambulatory surgery. Regional anesthesia can decrease postoperative pain, improve patient satisfaction, and expedite patient discharge. This article discusses the techniques, clinical pearls, and potential pitfalls associated with those blocks, which are most useful in an ambulatory perioperative setting. Interscalene, supraclavicular, infraclavicular, axillary, paravertebral, erector spinae, pectoralis, serratus anterior, transversus abdominis plane, femoral, adductor canal, popliteal, interspace between the popliteal artery and capsule of the knee, and ankle blocks are described.

KEYWORDS:

Ambulatory analgesia; Brachial plexus; PECS; PVB; Peripheral nerve blocks; Popliteal; Regional anesthesia; TAP

PMID:
31047129
DOI:
10.1016/j.anclin.2019.01.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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