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J Infect Dis. 2019 Jul 31;220(5):743-751. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiz205.

Standard-Dose Intradermal Influenza Vaccine Elicits Cellular Immune Responses Similar to Those of Intramuscular Vaccine in Men With and Those Without HIV Infection.

Author information

1
Battelle Memorial Institute, Atlanta, Georgia.
2
Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
Influenza Program, Bangkok, Thailand.
4
Department of Virology, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand.
5
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.
6
HIV/STD Research Program, Thailand Ministry of Public Health-CDC Collaboration, Nonthaburi, Bangkok, Thailand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons are at a higher risk of severe influenza. Although we have shown that a standard-dose intradermal influenza vaccine versus a standard-dose intramuscular influenza vaccine does not result in differences in hemagglutination-inhibition titers in this population, a comprehensive examination of cell-mediated immune responses remains lacking.

METHODS:

Serological, antigen-specific B-cell, and interleukin 2-, interferon γ-, and tumor necrosis factor α-secreting T-cell responses were assessed in 79 HIV-infected men and 79 HIV-uninfected men.

RESULTS:

The route of vaccination did not affect the immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G (IgG) plasmablast or memory B-cell response, although these were severely impaired in the group with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200 cells/μL. The frequencies of IgG memory B cells measured on day 28 after vaccination were highest in the HIV-uninfected group, followed by the group with a CD4+ T-cell count of ≥200 cells/μL and the group with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200 cells/μL. The route of vaccination did not affect the CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses measured at various times after vaccination.

CONCLUSIONS:

The route of vaccination had no effect on antibody responses, antibody avidity, T-cell responses, or B-cell responses in HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected subjects. With the serological and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination being impaired in HIV-infected individuals with a CD4+ T-cell count of <200 cells/μL, passive immunization strategies need to be explored to protect this population.

CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION:

NCT01538940.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Influenza; cell-mediated; intradermal; intramuscular; vaccination

PMID:
31045222
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiz205

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