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Prax Kinderpsychol Kinderpsychiatr. 2019 May;68(4):253-270. doi: 10.13109/prkk.2019.68.4.253.

["I Would Never have done it Without Coercion …" - Experiences with Coercion and Compulsion in a Family Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic Day Clinic].

[Article in German; Abstract available in German from the publisher]

Author information

1
Familientherapeutisches Zentrum (FaTZ) Familienpsychiatrische Akuttagesklinik Hermann-Walker-Str. 16 69151 Neckargemünd Deutschland.

Abstract

in English, German

"I Would Never have done it Without Coercion …" - Experiences with Coercion and Compulsion in a Family Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic Day Clinic Coercion and compulsion have negative connotations, especially in psychiatric therapy. But in families, children are always also affected if parents do not want or are not able to make use of therapy. The avoidance of therapy can be a symptom of illness, e. g. separation anxiety. Perceived or real external coercion, e. g. from the youth welfare office or school, can be used to initially open up access to therapy and to allow parents to become capable of acting again. Coercion can initially reduce the ambivalence of the parents. The Family Therapeutic Centre (FaTZ) is a psychiatric and psychotherapeutic day clinic for parents and children. Family constellations are described in which initial coercion was a door-opener to therapy. During courses of treatment therapeutic alliances could be established, hope for positive change emerged, and the outcome was favourable. School avoidance of the child (e. g. due to separation anxiety) in combination with mentally ill parents is an exemplary constellation in which initial coercion can pave the way to therapy for families that otherwise wouldn't get access. Afterwards, voluntary cooperation should be intended, as the overriding objective is to reduce coercive measures to a minimum.

KEYWORDS:

Eltern-Kind-Psychotherapie; Familienpsychiatrie; Trennungsangst; Zwang; Zwangskontext; coercion; compulsion; family psychiatry; parent-child psychotherapy; separation anxiety

PMID:
31044679
DOI:
10.13109/prkk.2019.68.4.253
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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