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Nat Genet. 2019 May;51(5):896-904. doi: 10.1038/s41588-019-0382-2. Epub 2019 May 1.

Exome sequencing highlights the role of wild-relative introgression in shaping the adaptive landscape of the wheat genome.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.
2
Agriculture Victoria, AgriBio, Centre for AgriBioscience, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
3
Department of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.
4
Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
5
Swift Current Research and Development Centre, Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada.
6
Integrated Genomics Facility, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.
7
Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN, USA.
8
Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, Indianapolis, IN, USA.
9
School of Applied Systems Biology, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
10
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Centre for Animal Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
11
Agriculture Victoria, AgriBio, Centre for AgriBioscience, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia. matthew.hayden@ecodev.vic.gov.au.
12
School of Applied Systems Biology, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia. matthew.hayden@ecodev.vic.gov.au.
13
Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA. eakhunov@ksu.edu.

Abstract

Introgression is a potential source of beneficial genetic diversity. The contribution of introgression to adaptive evolution and improvement of wheat as it was disseminated worldwide remains unknown. We used targeted re-sequencing of 890 diverse accessions of hexaploid and tetraploid wheat to identify wild-relative introgression. Introgression, and selection for improvement and environmental adaptation, each reduced deleterious allele burden. Introgression increased diversity genome wide and in regions harboring major agronomic genes, and contributed alleles explaining a substantial proportion of phenotypic variation. These results suggest that historic gene flow from wild relatives made a substantial contribution to the adaptive diversity of modern bread wheat.

PMID:
31043759
DOI:
10.1038/s41588-019-0382-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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