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J Family Med Prim Care. 2019 Mar;8(3):1112-1116. doi: 10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_308_18.

Outbreak investigation of cholera outbreak in a slum area of urban Wardha, India: An interventional epidemiological study.

Author information

1
Department of Community Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha, Maharashtra, India.

Abstract

Introduction:

Cholera, though a preventable and treatable disease, is still regarded as an important public health problem in developing countries including India. Migration, unhygienic living conditions, overcrowding, open field defecation, and ignorance about the spread of disease are the major reasons for the occurrence of cholera in the slum areas. Cholera was detected in the stool sample of a 3-year-old child from a slum area of urban Wardha, which demanded an urgent outbreak investigation to be carried out before it progressed into an epidemic.

Materials and Methods:

This was a cross-sectional epidemiological study, where we have used pretested, predesigned epidemiological case sheets obtained from IDSP. A case definition was proposed before beginning the investigation. Linelisting, collection of stool and water samples, immediate referral, and treatment of the patients suffering from loose stool and/or vomiting were performed. A detailed epidemiological report was made with recommendations and plan of action that was forwarded to the district health system.

Results:

In all, 28 suspected cases of cholera were line listed. Among the affected population, more than half of the suspected cases were from the age group of 0-10 years of age. Males were more affected when compared with females. The overall attack rate was 27% and case fatality rate was 0%. There was positive history of travel in the index case. Two of the water samples were found to be unsatisfactory for drinking.

Conclusion:

The investigation report was soon developed and shared with the district health authorities, and recommendations were given to prevent such outbreaks in future.

KEYWORDS:

Cholera; diarrhea; intervention epidemiology; outbreak investigation

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