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J Arthroplasty. 2019 Apr 9. pii: S0883-5403(19)30339-0. doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2019.04.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Robot-Assisted Total Knee Arthroplasty Does Not Improve Long-Term Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether robot-assisted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) improves the accuracy of radiographic alignment leading to improved patient satisfaction and implant survivorship in the long term has thus far been inconclusive.

METHODS:

We retrospectively compared the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of 84 knees that had undergone robot-assisted TKA using ROBODOC vs 79 knees that had undergone conventional TKA. The mean duration of the follow-up period was 129.1 months (range: 108-147 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Knee Society Score and 36-item Short Form Survey, as well as by assessing the range of motion, operation time, and complications. Radiologic outcomes were evaluated by assessing the hip-knee-ankle angle, coronal and sagittal alignments of the femoral and tibial components, and any radiologic abnormalities such as loosening or osteolysis.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference in clinical outcomes between the two groups. The prevalence of an outlier for the hip-knee-ankle angle in the robot-assisted group was 10.7%, whereas it was 16.5% in the conventional group (P = .172). The other component alignments (α°, β°, γ°, δ°) revealed a tendency toward a lower rate of outliers in the robot-assisted group, but without statistical significance (P > .05). In addition, there was no significant difference in complications, including revision surgery, between both groups.

CONCLUSION:

Robot-assisted TKA does not improve long-term clinical or radiologic outcomes compared with conventional TKA.

KEYWORDS:

conventional; long term; outcomes; robot assisted; total knee arthroplasty

PMID:
31036450
DOI:
10.1016/j.arth.2019.04.007

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