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Biomed Pharmacother. 2019 Jul;115:108879. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2019.108879. Epub 2019 Apr 28.

Comprehensive behavioral study of the effects of vanillin inhalation in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Technology, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Okayama, 701-0193, Japan. Electronic address: dhe422007@s.okayama-u.ac.jp.
2
Division of Food and Nutrition, Nakamura Gakuen University Junior College, Fukuoka, 814-0198, Japan. Electronic address: atsushimada@nakamura-u.ac.jp.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: ssue@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: muraka@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: n-kitamura@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: k-wani@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: yuuu.takahashi@gmail.com.
8
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan. Electronic address: ymatsumoto@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp.
9
Department of Medical Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan. Electronic address: mokamoto@md.okayama-u.ac.jp.
10
Department of Health and Sports Science, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Okayama, 701-0193, Japan. Electronic address: f-ari@mw.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.
11
Department of Psychiatry, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, 701-0192, Japan. Electronic address: t-ishihara@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jp.

Abstract

Vanillin is widely used in food and cosmetics, among other substances, for its sweet smell. However, the neuropsychological effects of vanillin inhalation have not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effect of vanillin inhalation on mouse behavior. First, we investigated whether the aroma of vanillin was attractive or repulsive for mice. Thereafter, the mice inhaled vanillin for 20 min before each test in a series of behavioral tests (elevated plus maze, open field, Y-maze, tail suspension, cotton bud biting, and Porsolt forced swim tests). In these tests, the mice showed a neutral response to vanillin. Mice that inhaled vanillin had a suppressed pain response in the hot plate test. In addition, the grip strength of the forelimbs of mice that inhaled vanillin was decreased. No significant differences were found between the mice inhaling vanillin and control mice in the open field, Y-maze, tail suspension, forced swimming, and aggression tests. These results show that vanillin inhalation has anti-nociceptive effects, similar to other routes of administration. The results also show that vanillin inhalation does not cause significant behavioral effects.

KEYWORDS:

Analgesia; Anti-nociceptive; Essential oil; Inhalation; Vanillin

PMID:
31035009
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopha.2019.108879
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