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LGBT Health. 2019 May/Jun;6(4):174-183. doi: 10.1089/lgbt.2018.0229. Epub 2019 May 7.

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health, Substance Use, and Bullying Victimization Among Self-Identified Bisexual High School-Aged Youth.

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1
1 Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
2
2 Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

Purpose: Sexual minority youth are at increased risk for mental health problems and substance use, and accumulating evidence indicates that bisexual youth are at greatest risk. However, bisexual youth are not a homogenous group and scholars have called for greater attention to the intersections of multiple marginalized identities. As such, we examined racial/ethnic differences in mental health (sadness/hopelessness and suicidal ideation), substance use (cigarette use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and other illicit drug use), and bullying (in-person and electronic) among self-identified bisexual high school-aged youth (overall and by sex). Method: Data from the local versions of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey were pooled across jurisdictions and years (2011-2015), resulting in an analytic sample of 18,515 bisexual youth who were racially/ethnically diverse. Results: Black and Hispanic bisexual youth were less likely to report in-person and electronic bullying than White bisexual youth. In addition, Black bisexual youth were less likely to report sadness/hopelessness and suicidal ideation than White, Hispanic, and Other race/ethnicity bisexual youth. Black bisexual female youth were also less likely to report cigarette use, binge drinking, and other illicit drug use than White bisexual female youth. In contrast to most of our findings, Black bisexual youth were more likely to report marijuana use than White bisexual youth. Most of the significant racial/ethnic differences in mental health and substance use remained significant after controlling for bullying. Conclusion: These findings highlight the heterogeneity of bisexual youth and the need to consider multiple marginalized identities to understand the health disparities affecting this diverse population.

KEYWORDS:

bisexual; bullying; ethnicity; mental health; race; substance use

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