Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Immunol. 2019 Jul;341:103918. doi: 10.1016/j.cellimm.2019.04.006. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Lactic acid suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell function in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-2012, United States.
2
Department of Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208, United States.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103, United States.
4
Department of Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284-2012, United States. Electronic address: jjryan@vcu.edu.

Abstract

Mast cells have functional plasticity affected by their tissue microenvironment, which greatly impacts their inflammatory responses. Because lactic acid (LA) is abundant in inflamed tissues and tumors, we investigated how it affects mast cell function. Using IgE-mediated activation as a model system, we found that LA suppressed inflammatory cytokine production and degranulation in mouse peritoneal mast cells, data that were confirmed with human skin mast cells. In mouse peritoneal mast cells, LA-mediated cytokine suppression was dependent on pH- and monocarboxylic transporter-1 expression. Additionally, LA reduced IgE-induced Syk, Btk, and ERK phosphorylation, key signals eliciting inflammation. In vivo, LA injection reduced IgE-mediated hypothermia in mice undergoing passive systemic anaphylaxis. Our data suggest that LA may serve as a feedback inhibitor that limits mast cell-mediated inflammation.

KEYWORDS:

Allergy; Anaphylaxis; Asthma; Inflammation; Lactate

PMID:
31030957
PMCID:
PMC6579658
[Available on 2020-07-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cellimm.2019.04.006

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center