Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Emerg Med. 2019 Apr 22. pii: S0736-4679(19)30228-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2019.03.022. [Epub ahead of print]

Child Sexual Abuse identified in Emergency Departments Using ICD-9-CM, 2011 to 2014.

Author information

1
Department of Community Medicine and Healthcare, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, Connecticut.
3
Department of Community Medicine and Healthcare, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, Connecticut; Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, Connecticut.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Child sexual abuse (CSA) is poorly identified due to its hidden nature and difficulty surrounding disclosure. Surveillance using emergency department (ED) data may identify victims and provide information on their demographic profile.

OBJECTIVES:

Study aims were to calculate the prevalence of visits assigned an explicit or suggestive medical diagnosis code (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM]) for CSA and compare the demographic profile of ED visits by coding type.

METHODS:

This study examined ED data for children < 10 years of age in Connecticut from 2011 to 2014. Cases involving CSA were identified using explicit and suggestive ICD-9-CM codes and age qualifiers previously established in the literature, and compared across visit characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, sex, and primary insurance payer, and town group).

RESULTS:

ICD-9-CM codes for explicit CSA were identified in 110 ED visits, or 1.7 per 10,000 total ED visits. Inclusion of ICD-9-CM codes for suggestive CSA identified an additional 630 visits (9.7 per 10,000 visits). Suggestive codes identified proportionally more visits of younger (50% vs. 38%) and male (35% vs. 22%) children, compared with the explicit code (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates one method for identifying CSA cases, which has the potential to increase surveillance of victims in the ED. Results imply that explicit codes alone may overlook most cases, whereas use of suggestive codes may identify additional cases, and proportionally more young and male victims. As the health consequences of CSA are severe, innovative forms of surveillance must be explored to detect a higher number of cases and improve the clinical care of patients.

KEYWORDS:

International Classification of Diseases; child sexual abuse; emergency departments; epidemiology

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center