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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2019 Jul;122:133-137. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.04.015. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Nasal cytology in children with primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatrics, "F. Del Ponte" Hospital, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: luana.nosetti@uninsubria.it.
2
Department of Surgical Sciences, Dentistry, Gynecology and Pediatrics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: giorgio.piacentini@univr.it.
3
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Insubria and ASST Laghi, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: alberto.macchi@asst-settelaghi.it.
4
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Insubria and ASST Laghi, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: francesca.debernardi@ospedale.varese.it.
5
Division of Pediatrics, "F. Del Ponte" Hospital, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: daniela_simoncini@libero.it.
6
Division of Pediatrics, "F. Del Ponte" Hospital, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: martina.nicoloso@gmail.com.
7
Division of Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, "F. Del Ponte" Hospital, Varese, Italy. Electronic address: massimo.agosti@ospedale.varese.it.
8
Department of Surgical Sciences, Dentistry, Gynecology and Pediatrics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: marco.zaffanello@univr.it.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Rhinitis is an acute or chronic inflammatory condition due to several causes (i.e. infections, allergens). There are controversial results that point out the role of nasal inflammation in primary snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS).

METHODS:

The aim of the present investigation is to study the nasal cytology in 58 children aged from 1 to 15 affected by sleep disordered breathing.

RESULTS:

Inflammation of the nasal mucous was found in 88% of children. The most frequent problems were infectious rhinitis (36%), followed by non-allergic rhinitis (28%) and allergic rhinitis (21%). Infectious rhinitis was found in 31% of children with primary snoring and 41% with OSAS. Allergic rhinitis was found in 35% of children with primary snoring, and 6% with OSAS. Non-allergic rhinitis was found in 19% of children with primary snoring, and 34% with OSAS. Bacteria was found in 59% of children with OSAS and 46% in children with primary snoring.

CONCLUSION:

the most prevalent forms of rhinitis in primary snoring were the allergic rhinitis, and in OSAS group were the non-allergic rhinitis. Bacteria were equally distributed in primary snoring and OSAS children. The nasal cytology provided interesting information that can be used to plan possible treatment strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Nasal cytology; Obstructive sleep disordered breathing; Primary snoring; Rhinitis

PMID:
31022683
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2019.04.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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