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SAGE Open Med. 2019 Apr 16;7:2050312119843706. doi: 10.1177/2050312119843706. eCollection 2019.

Prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2 in Nigeria's capital territory and meta-analysis of Nigerian studies.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.
2
Department of Biosciences, COMSATS University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
3
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Public Health, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Abstract

Objectives:

This study was aimed at determining human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2 prevalence among apparently healthy, immunocompromised and haematologic malignant individuals in Nigeria's capital, as well as meta-analysis of all Nigerian studies until date.

Methods:

A total of 200 participants were recruited into a cross-sectional study. In total, 1 mL each of sera and plasma were obtained from 5 mL blood of each participant and analysed for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; positive samples confirmed with qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, followed by statistical and meta-analysis. Sociodemographic characteristics and possible risk factors were assessed via questionnaires.

Results:

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay yielded 1% prevalence which was confirmed to be zero via polymerase chain reaction. A total of 119 (59.5%) of the participants were male, while the mean age was 35.28 ± 13.61 years. Apart from sex and blood reception/donation, there was generally a low rate of exposure to human T-lymphotropic virus-associated risk factors. Meta-analysis revealed pooled prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 and 2 to be 3% and 0%, respectively, from Nigerian studies.

Conclusion:

This study discovered zero prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2 from five major hospitals in Nigeria's capital, exposing the importance of confirmatory assays after positive antibody detection assay results. Meta-analysis highlighted the existence of very few reliable Nigerian studies compared to the demography of the nation. Large-scale epidemiological studies and routine screening of risk populations are therefore needed since Nigeria lies in the region of endemicity.

KEYWORDS:

HTLV; blood donors; haematologic malignancies; leukaemia; lymphoma; lymphoproliferative disorders

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of conflicting interests: The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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