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Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019 Mar 24;2019:1327986. doi: 10.1155/2019/1327986. eCollection 2019.

Immunohistochemical Study of Antioxidant Enzymes Regulated by Nrf2 in the Models of Epileptic Seizures (KA and PTZ).

Author information

1
Laboratório de Neuropatologia Experimental, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Manuel Velasco Suárez, Mexico.
2
Departamento de Neuroquímica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Manuel Velasco Suárez, Mexico.
3
Departamento de Neurogenética, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Manuel Velasco Suárez, Mexico.

Abstract

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent spontaneous seizures due to an imbalance between cerebral excitability and inhibition, with a tendency towards uncontrolled excitability. Epilepsy has been associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress due to prolonged neuronal hyperexcitation and loss neurons during seizures. The experimental animal models report level of ATP diminished and increase in lipid peroxidation, catalase, and glutathione altered activity in the brain. We studied the immunohistochemical expression and localization of antioxidant enzymes GPx, SOD, and CAT in the rat brains treated with KA and PTZ. A significant decrease was observed in the number of immunoreactive cells to GPx, without significant changes for SOD and CAT in KA-treated rats, and decrease in the number of immunoreactive cells to SOD, without significant changes for GPx and only CAT in PTZ-treated rats. Evident immunoreactivity of GPx, SOD, and CAT was observed mainly in astrocytes and neurons of the hippocampal brain region in rats exposed at KA; similar results were observed in rats treated with PTZ at the first hours. These results provide evidence supporting the role of activation of the Nrf2 antioxidant system pathway against oxidative stress effects in the experimental models of epileptic seizures.

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