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Res Microbiol. 2019 Jun - Aug;170(4-5):202-213. doi: 10.1016/j.resmic.2019.04.002. Epub 2019 Apr 21.

Comparative genomics and proteogenomics highlight key molecular players involved in Frankia sporulation.

Author information

1
Écologie Microbienne, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 5557, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, INRA, UMR 1418, Villeurbanne, 69622 Cedex, France.
2
Univ Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Évolutive, 43 bd du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622, Villeurbanne, France.
3
Laboratoire Innovations Technologiques pour la Détection et le Diagnostic (Li2D), Service de Pharmacologie et Immunoanalyse (SPI), CEA, INRA, Bagnols sur Cèze, F-30207, France.
4
Écologie Microbienne, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 5557, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, INRA, UMR 1418, Villeurbanne, 69622 Cedex, France. Electronic address: aude.herrera-belaroussi@univ-lyon1.fr.

Abstract

Sporulation is a microbial adaptive strategy to resist inhospitable conditions for vegetative growth and to disperse to colonise more favourable environments. This microbial trait is widespread in Actinobacteria. Among them, Frankia strains are able to differentiate sporangia in pure culture, while others can sporulate even when in symbiosis with sporulation occurring within host cells. The molecular determinants controlling Frankia sporulation have not been yet described. In order to highlight, for the first time, the molecular players potentially involved in Frankia sporulation, we conducted (i) a comparison of protein contents between Frankia spores and hyphae and (ii) a comparative genomic analysis of Frankia proteomes with sporulating and non-sporulating Actinobacteria. Among the main results, glycogen-metabolism related proteins, as well as oxidative stress response and protease-like proteins were overdetected in hyphae, recalling lytic processes that allow Streptomyces cells to erect sporogenic hyphae. Several genes encoding transcriptional regulators, including GntR-like, appeared up-regulated in spores, as well as tyrosinase, suggesting their potential role in mature spore metabolism. Finally, our results highlighted new proteins potentially involved in Frankia sporulation, including a pyrophosphate-energized proton pump and YaaT, described as involved in the phosphorelay allowing sporulation in Bacillus subtilis, leading us to discuss the role of a phosphorelay in Frankia sporulation.

KEYWORDS:

Actinorhizal symbiosis; Desiccation; Frankia sporulation; Secondary metabolites; Starvation

PMID:
31018159
DOI:
10.1016/j.resmic.2019.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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