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Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet. 2019 Jul;180(5):291-304. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.b.32728. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

The association between newborn screening analytes and childhood autism in a Texas Medicaid population, 2010-2012.

Author information

1
Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.
2
Center for Analytics and Decision Support, Texas Health and Human Services Commission, Austin, Texas.
3
School of Community and Rural Health, University of Texas Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas.
4
Population Health, Office of Health Affairs, UT System, Austin, Texas.
5
Center for Health Statistics, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.
6
Biochemistry and Genetics Branch, Laboratory Services Section, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Children's Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Wesley Family Services, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
9
Newborn Screening and Genetics Unit, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.
10
Environmental Epidemiology and Disease Registries Section, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.

Abstract

Autism (or autism spectrum disorder [ASD]) is an often disabling childhood neurologic condition of mostly unknown cause. It is commonly diagnosed at 3 or 4 years of age. We explored whether there was an association of any analytes measured by newborn screening tests with a later diagnosis of ASD. A database was compiled of 3-5 year-old patients with any ASD diagnosis in the Texas Medicaid system in 2010-2012. Two controls (without any ASD diagnosis) were matched to each case by infant sex and birth year/month. All study subjects were linked to their 2007-2009 birth and newborn screening laboratory records, including values for 36 analytes or analyte ratios. We examined the association of analytes/ratios with a later diagnosis of ASD. Among 3,258 cases and 6,838 controls, seven analytes (e.g., 17-hydroxyprogesterone, acylcarnitines) were associated with a later ASD diagnosis. In this exploratory study, an ASD diagnosis was associated with 7 of 36 newborn screening analytes/ratios. These findings should be replicated in other population-based datasets.

KEYWORDS:

autism; autism spectrum disorder; case control study; epidemiology; newborn screening

PMID:
31016859
DOI:
10.1002/ajmg.b.32728

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