Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2019 May;27(5):716-723. doi: 10.1002/oby.22444.

Effect of Obesogenic Medications on Weight-Loss Outcomes in a Behavioral Weight-Management Program.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California, USA.
2
Division of Gastroenterology, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
3
School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
4
Clinical and Translational Research Institute, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
5
Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
6
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.
7
Institute of Diabetes and Metabolic Health, University of California, San Diego, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to evaluate a possible association between the use of obesogenic medications and inadequate weight loss in a behavioral weight-management program.

METHODS:

This is a case-control, single-center study of 666 adult patients within a Veterans Health Administration health system who participated in the MOVE! behavioral weight-loss program. The cohort was divided into responders (n = 150), patients who achieved ≥ 5% total weight loss by the end of the MOVE! program, and nonresponders (n = 516), those who achieved < 5% total weight loss. We reviewed each patient's medical records for exposure to obesogenic medication during the time of treatment.

RESULTS:

Approximately 62% (n = 411) of patients entering MOVE! had a prescription for obesogenic medications. Obesogenic medication use was associated with worse weight-loss outcomes, and participants were 37% less likely to achieve a clinically meaningful (≥ 5% total weight loss) outcome at the end of the MOVE! program (odds ratio, 0.633; 95% CI: 0.427-0.937; adjusted P = 0.022). Patients who received three or more medications (n = 72) had the greatest difficulty achieving 5% weight loss compared with the control group (odds ratio, 0.265; 95% CI: 0.108-0.646; adjusted P = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of provider-prescribed obesogenic medications was associated with worse weight-loss outcomes in a behavioral weight-loss program. Closer scrutiny of patient medications is necessary to help improve outcomes of weight-loss treatments.

PMID:
31012292
PMCID:
PMC6544176
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22444

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center