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Asian-Australas J Anim Sci. 2019 Apr 15. doi: 10.5713/ajas.19.0063. [Epub ahead of print]

Effect of different sources and inclusion levels of dietary fat on productive performance and egg quality in laying hens raised under hot environmental conditions.

Author information

1
1Department of Animal Science and Technology, Chung-Ang University, Anseong 17546, Korea.
2
Poultry Research Institute, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Pyeongchang 25342, Korea.

Abstract

Objective:

This experiment aimed to investigate the effect of different sources and inclusion levels of dietary fat on productive performance and egg quality in laying hens raised under hot environmental conditions.

Method:

A total of 480 Hy-Line Brown laying hens at 31 wk of age were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 experimental diets. The control diet contained 2,800 kcal/kg AMEn with no fat addition. Four additional diets were prepared by adding 2.0 or 4.0% of animal fat (AF) or soybean oil (SO). Energy and nutrient concentrations were consistent among all diets. Diets were fed to hens for 4 weeks. Average daily room temperature and humidity were 26.7 ± 1.52°C and 77.4 ± 4.50%. The heat stress index was approximately 76, indicating that hens were raised under heat stress conditions.

Results:

Final BW was greater (p<0.05) for hens fed diets containing 2.0 or 4.0% AF than for those fed the control diet or diets containing 2.0 or 4.0% SO. The BW gain and feed intake were greater (p<0.05) for hens fed diets containing additional AF or SO than those fed the control diet. Eggshell thickness were the greatest (p<0.05) for hens fed the control diet, but the least (p<0.05) for hens fed diets containing 4.0% SO. Egg yolk color was the greatest (p<0.05) for hens fed to the control diet, but the least (p<0.05) for hens fed diets containing 4.0% SO.

Conclusion:

Inclusion of supplemental fat (AF and SO) in diets exhibits preventative effects on BW loss for hens raised under hot environmental conditions when energy and nutrient concentrations in diets were maintained. The effects were greater for AF than for SO. However, inclusion of supplemental fat in diets decreases eggshell thickness and egg yolk yellowness, possibly due to a reduction in Ca absorption and intake of egg yolk colorants.

KEYWORDS:

Egg Quality; Fat Source; Hot Environmental Condition; Inclusion Level of Dietary Fat; Laying Hen; Productive Performance

PMID:
31010965
DOI:
10.5713/ajas.19.0063
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