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J Strength Cond Res. 2019 Apr 18. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000003145. [Epub ahead of print]

Influence of High- and Low-Frequency Resistance Training on Lean Body Mass and Muscle Strength Gains in Untrained Men.

Author information

1
Exercise Biology Research Group (BioEx), Federal University of Triangulo Mineiro (UFTM), Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
2
Department of Sport Sciences, Health Science Institute, Federal University of Triangulo Mineiro (UFTM), Uberaba, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Abstract

Franco, CMC, Carneiro, MAS, de Sousa, JFR, Gomes, GK, and Orsatti, FL. Influence of high- and low-frequency resistance training on lean body mass and muscle strength gains in untrained men. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2019-The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-frequency resistance training (HFRT) performs better in lean body mass (LBM) and muscle strength gains when compared with low-frequency resistance training (LFRT). Eighteen untrained males (height: 1.76 ± 0.05 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 13.5 kg, and age: 22.1 ± 2.2 years) were randomly allocated into HFRT (n = 9) and LFRT (n = 9). Muscle strength {1 repetition maximum (RM) (bench press [BP] and unilateral leg extension [LE])} and LBM (DXA) were assessed at before and after 8 weeks of training. Both groups performed 7 whole-body resistance exercises, standardized to 10 sets per week, 8-12 maximal repetitions, and 90-120 seconds of rest in a 5-day resistance training routine. The LFRT performed a split-body routine, training each specific muscle group once a week. The HFRT performed a total-body routine, training all muscle groups every session and progressed from a training frequency of once per week to a training frequency of 5 times per week. Lean body mass increased without differences between groups (HFRT = 1.0 kg vs. LFRT = 1.5 kg; p = 0.377). Similarly, 1RM increased without differences between groups (right LE, HFRT = 21.2 kg vs. LFRT = 19.7 kg, p = 0.782; BP, HFRT = 7.1 kg vs. LFRT = 4.5 kg, p = 0.293). These findings suggest that in young untrained men, progressing from a training frequency of once per week to a training frequency of 5 times per week with equated volume produces similar gains in LBM and muscle strength as a constant training frequency of once per week, over an 8-week training period.

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