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Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Apr;98(16):e15324. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000015324.

Progressive sacroiliitis due to accessory sacroiliac joint mimicking ankylosing spondylitis: A case report.

Author information

1
Department of Rheumatology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

An accessory sacroiliac (SI) joint usually has little clinical significance. However, severe arthritic changes can cause chronic buttock or low back pain and can be misdiagnosed as another disease presenting with sacroiliitis such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

PATIENT CONCERNS:

A 33-year-old woman was diagnosed with AS due to chronic buttock pain and progressive sacroiliitis on plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Her buttock and low back pain gradually worsened despite proper treatment for AS.

DIAGNOSIS:

Computed tomography revealed an accessory SI joint with arthritic changes.

INTERVENTIONS:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and restricted movement were prescribed.

OUTCOMES:

The symptoms were controlled with NSAIDs, rest, and restriction of excessive movement. The medication could be stopped after the pain subsided.

LESSONS:

An accessory SI joint can be a cause of chronic back pain and can be misdiagnosed as AS with sacroiliitis when progressive arthritic changes are observed. Therefore, additional imaging studies other than conventional X-ray or MRI may be required for accurate diagnosis.

PMID:
31008988
PMCID:
PMC6494240
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000015324
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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