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Clin Rehabil. 2019 Apr 22:269215519844554. doi: 10.1177/0269215519844554. [Epub ahead of print]

Effect of adding interferential current stimulation to exercise on outcomes in primary care patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
1 Department of Physiotherapy, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
2
2 Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.
3
3 Physiotherapy Department, Andalusian Health Service, Seville, Spain.
4
4 Primary Health Care, Andalusian Health Service, Málaga, Spain.
5
5 Department of Nursing, Physical Therapy and Medicine, University of Almeria, Almeria, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effect of adding interferential current stimulation to exercise on pain, disability, psychological status and range of motion in patients with neck pain.

DESIGN:

A single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

Primary care physiotherapy units.

SUBJECTS:

A total of 84 patients diagnosed with non-specific mechanical neck pain. This sample was divided into two groups randomly: experimental ( n = 42) versus control group ( n = 42).

INTERVENTIONS:

Patients in both groups had a supervised therapeutic exercise programme, with the experimental group having additional interferential current stimulation treatment.

MAIN MEASURES:

The main measures used were intensity of neck pain according to the Visual Analogue Scale; the degree of disability according to the Neck Disability Index and the CORE Outcome Measure; anxiety and depression levels according to the Goldberg scale; apprehension as measured by the Personal Psychological Apprehension scale; and the range of motion of the cervical spine. The sample was evaluated at baseline and posttreatment (10 sessions/two weeks).

RESULTS:

Statistically significant differences between groups at posttreatment were observed for Visual Analogue Scale (2.73 ± 1.24 vs 4.99 ± 1.56), Neck Disability Index scores (10.60 ± 4.77 vs 18.45 ± 9.04), CORE Outcome Measure scores (19.18 ± 9.99 vs 35.12 ± 13.36), Goldberg total score (6.17 ± 4.27 vs 7.90 ± 4.87), Goldberg Anxiety subscale, Personal Psychological Apprehension Scale scores (28.17 ± 9.61 vs 26.29 ± 11.14) and active and passive right rotation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adding interferential current stimulation to exercise resulted in better immediate outcome across a range of measures.

KEYWORDS:

Range of movement; exercise; interferential currents; neck pain

PMID:
31007047
DOI:
10.1177/0269215519844554

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