Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Affect Disord. 2019 Jun 1;252:475-483. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2019.04.041. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Pilot trial of home-administered transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of depression.

Author information

1
School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales/Black Dog Institute, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. Electronic address: a.alonzo@unsw.edu.au.
2
School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales/Black Dog Institute, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia.
3
School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales/Black Dog Institute, Hospital Road, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia; St George Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Health, Level 2, James Laws House, Gray St, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive, neuromodulation approach with promising efficacy for treating depression. To date, tDCS has been limited to clinical or research centre settings with treatment administered by staff. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy, tolerability and feasibility of home-administered, remotely-supervised tDCS for depression.

METHODS:

In an open label trial, 34 participants used a Soterix 1 × 1 mini-CT device to self-administer 20-28 tDCS sessions (2 mA, 30 min, F3-anode and F8-cathode montage according to 10-20 EEG placement) over 4 weeks followed by a taper phase of 4 sessions 1 week apart. Participants were initially monitored via video link and then through completion of an online treatment diary. Mixed effects repeated measures analyses assessed change in mood scores.

RESULTS:

Mood improved significantly from baseline (27.47 on Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale) to 1 month after the end of acute treatment (15.48) (p < 0.001). Side effects were largely transient and minor. Outcomes were comparable to those reported in clinic-based trials. Protocol adherence was excellent with a drop-out rate of 6% and 93% of scheduled sessions completed.

LIMITATIONS:

The tDCS and remote monitoring procedures employed in this study require a level of manual dexterity and computer literacy, which may be challenging for some patients. This study did not have a control condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides initial evidence that home-based, remotely-supervised tDCS treatment may be efficacious and feasible for depressed patients and has high translational potential.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial; Major depressive disorder; Psychiatric somatic therapies; Safety; Transcranial direct current stimulation

PMID:
31005790
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2019.04.041

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center