Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2019 Dec;41(12):1734-1741. doi: 10.1016/j.jogc.2019.02.016. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Impact of Episiotomy During Operative Vaginal Delivery on Obstetrical Anal Sphincter Injuries.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alberta, Lois Hole Hospital for Women, Edmonton, AB.
2
Alberta Perinatal Health Program, Calgary, AB.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alberta, Lois Hole Hospital for Women, Edmonton, AB. Electronic address: mospina@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to describe associations between episiotomy at the time of forceps or vacuum-assisted delivery and obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS).

METHODS:

This population-based retrospective cohort study used delivery information from a provincial perinatal clinical database. Full-term, singleton, in-hospital, operative vaginal deliveries of vertex-presenting infants from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2016 were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between episiotomy and third- or fourth-degree lacerations were calculated in multiple logistic regression models (Canadian Task Force Classification II-2).

RESULTS:

Episiotomy was performed in 34% of 52 241 operative vaginal deliveries. OASIS occurred in 21% of forceps deliveries and 7.6% of vacuum deliveries. Episiotomy was associated with increased odds of severe perineal lacerations for vacuum deliveries among women with (OR 2.48; 95% CI 1.96-3.13) and without (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.22) a prior vaginal delivery. Among forceps deliveries, episiotomy was associated with increased odds of OASIS for those with a previous vaginal delivery (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.12-2.06), but it was protective for women with no previous vaginal delivery (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.67-0.79). Midline compared with mediolateral episiotomy increased the odds of OASIS in forceps deliveries (OR 2.73; 95% CI 2.37-3.13) and vacuum deliveries (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.65-2.28).

CONCLUSION:

In conclusion, results suggest that episiotomy should be used with caution, particularly among women with a previous vaginal delivery and in the setting of vacuum-assisted delivery. Episiotomy may protect against OASIS in forceps-assisted deliveries for women without a prior vaginal delivery.

KEYWORDS:

Episiotomy; anal canal injuries; obstetrical delivery; obstetrical extraction

PMID:
31003947
DOI:
10.1016/j.jogc.2019.02.016

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center