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Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2019 Apr 19. doi: 10.1002/ccd.28291. [Epub ahead of print]

Emergency treatment of iatrogenic coronary perforation by transcatheter embolization with gelatin sponge particles-Description of technique.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Poznań University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.
2
Department of Interventional Cardiology, HCP Medical Center Poznań, Poznan, Poland.

Abstract

Coronary artery perforation (CAP) is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) that requires prompt diagnosis and effective treatment. Importantly, dynamic advances in interventional cardiology reflected by the increasing percentage of more challenging PCIs performed in more complex lesions have resulted in significant changes in CAPs pattern. Herein, we describe a technique and present a case report of CAP that occurred during percutaneous recanalization of the occluded restenotic right coronary artery (RCA) successfully treated with transcatheter embolization using gelatin sponge particles prepared on-site. The patient underwent coronary angiography with a subsequent attempt to open chronically occluded RCA. During the procedure, a guidewire was inadvertently positioned outside the arterial bed resulting in type III CAP. After unsuccessful prolonged balloon inflations as well as an anticoagulation reversal, embolization of the RCA with gelatin sponge particles as an ultima ratio treatment was performed. Sponge particles were prepared on-site by the operator, by cutting gelatin sponge used for wound healing. The procedure resulted in a total occlusion of the RCA and significant clinical improvement. The patient did not require pericardiocentesis and was discharged from the hospital after 10 days of an uneventful postprocedural course. The described technique is an easy and effective method of guidewire-related CAPs treatment in whom stent grafts cannot be implanted. Noteworthy, the technique can be applied in most cath labs as it utilizes a widely available gelatin sponge and does not require any specific expertise.

KEYWORDS:

coronary angioplasty; coronary perforation; gelatin sponge; tamponade

PMID:
31002207
DOI:
10.1002/ccd.28291

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