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Science. 2019 Apr 19;364(6437):255. doi: 10.1126/science.aav7893. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Spontaneous behaviors drive multidimensional, brainwide activity.

Author information

1
HHMI Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA. stringerc@janelia.hhmi.org pachitarium@janelia.hhmi.org kenneth.harris@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit, UCL, London W1T 4JG, UK.
3
UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1E 6DE, UK.
4
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, London EC1V 9EL, UK.
5
UCL Institute of Neurology, London WC1E 6DE, UK. stringerc@janelia.hhmi.org pachitarium@janelia.hhmi.org kenneth.harris@ucl.ac.uk.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Neuronal populations in sensory cortex produce variable responses to sensory stimuli and exhibit intricate spontaneous activity even without external sensory input. Cortical variability and spontaneous activity have been variously proposed to represent random noise, recall of prior experience, or encoding of ongoing behavioral and cognitive variables. Recording more than 10,000 neurons in mouse visual cortex, we observed that spontaneous activity reliably encoded a high-dimensional latent state, which was partially related to the mouse's ongoing behavior and was represented not just in visual cortex but also across the forebrain. Sensory inputs did not interrupt this ongoing signal but added onto it a representation of external stimuli in orthogonal dimensions. Thus, visual cortical population activity, despite its apparently noisy structure, reliably encodes an orthogonal fusion of sensory and multidimensional behavioral information.

Comment in

PMID:
31000656
PMCID:
PMC6525101
DOI:
10.1126/science.aav7893
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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