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Food Res Int. 2019 Jun;120:178-187. doi: 10.1016/j.foodres.2019.02.033. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Alcalase-hydrolyzed oyster (Crassostrea rivularis) meat enhances antioxidant and aphrodisiac activities in normal male mice.

Author information

1
College of Light Industry and Food Engineering, Guangxi University, No. 100, Daxue Road, Guangxi, Nanning 530004, China; College of Food Engineering, Beibu Gulf University, No. 12 Binhai Road, Guangxi, Qinzhou 535000, China.
2
Department of Food Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangdong, Guangzhou 510640, China.
3
College of Light Industry and Food Engineering, Guangxi University, No. 100, Daxue Road, Guangxi, Nanning 530004, China. Electronic address: liuxling@gxu.edu.cn.
4
College of Light Industry and Food Engineering, Guangxi University, No. 100, Daxue Road, Guangxi, Nanning 530004, China; Department of Food Science and Technology, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangdong, Guangzhou 510640, China. Electronic address: zmmgxu@gxu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The antioxidant and aphrodisiac properties of oyster meat (OM) and its hydrolysates by alcalase (OMA) were compared. The results showed that OMA displayed a higher antioxidant activity than OM with or without gastrointestinal digestion. Furthermore, the study reported that oral administration of OM or OMA could induce aphrodisiac activities and consequently enhance the sexual behavior in normal male mice, at a dose of 250 mg/kg. Additionally, OMA also exhibited better antioxidant activity in vivo than OM by improving the activities of the endogenous cellular antioxidant enzymes and decreasing the MDA levels, which may be helpful in improving the sexual function. These results indicated that oysters' could be a potential functional ingredient with antioxidant and aphrodisiac activities, and the activities could be improved by alcalase hydrolysis.

KEYWORDS:

Alcalase treatment; Antioxidant activity; Aphrodisiac property; Bioactive peptide; Oysters; Simulated digestion

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