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JACC Cardiovasc Interv. 2019 Apr 22;12(8):781-789. doi: 10.1016/j.jcin.2019.02.049.

Habitual Physical Activity in Older Adults Undergoing TAVR: Insights From the FRAILTY-AVR Study.

Author information

1
Centre for Heart Valve Innovation, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
3
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Institut de Cardiologie de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
5
Institut Cardiovasculaire Paris Sud, Hôpital Privé Jacques Cartier, Massy, France.
6
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
7
Hamilton Health Sciences, Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
8
St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
St. Boniface Hospital, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
10
Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Centre de Recherche du CHUM, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
11
Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, New Jersey.
12
Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: jonathan.afilalo@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The authors sought to assess the distribution and prognostic significance of habitual physical activity (HPA) in older adults undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

BACKGROUND:

Low HPA is associated with mortality and disability in community-dwelling older adults. In the setting of TAVR, it is unclear whether low HPA is a risk factor for downstream morbidity or a byproduct of severe aortic stenosis that improves following its correction.

METHODS:

Older adults undergoing TAVR in the prospective multicentre FRAILTY-AVR (Frailty in Aortic Valve Replacement) study were interviewed to quantify their HPA in kilocalories/week using a validated questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 12 months.

RESULTS:

The cohort consisted of 755 patients with a median age of 84.0 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 80.0 to 87.0 years). At baseline, median HPA was 1,116 kcal/week (IQR: 227 to 2,715 kcal/week) with 73% of patients performing <150 min/week of moderate or vigorous HPA. Sedentary patients were more likely to be older, female, frail, cognitively impaired, depressed, and have multimorbidity, although they had similar left ventricular function and aortic stenosis severity. In the logistic regression model adjusting for these covariates, HPA was found to be associated with mortality at 12 months (odds ratio: 0.84/100 kcal; 95% confidence interval: 0.73 to 0.98). HPA was associated with longer length of stay, discharge to health care facilities, and disability. At 12 months, median HPA among survivors was 933 kcal/week (IQR: 0 to 2,334 kcal/week) with pre-existing frailty being independently predictive of worsening HPA following TAVR.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sedentary patients have a higher risk of mortality and functional decline following TAVR.

KEYWORDS:

aortic stenosis; habitual physical exercise capacity; outcomes; survival; transcatheter aortic valve replacement

PMID:
31000014
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcin.2019.02.049

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