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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Aug 30;178:94-104. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.04.013. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Chronic exposure to green light aggravates high-fat diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorders in male mice.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 211198, PR China; School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 211198, PR China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 211198, PR China; School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 211198, PR China; State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, PR China. Electronic address: changliu@cpu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Light is involved in many critical physiological or biochemical processes of human beings, such as visual sensing and the production of vitamin D. Recent studies have showed that the lights of different wavelengths have a profound influence in life activities. For example, blue light promotes alertness, whereas green light (GL) induces sleep in mice. On the other hand, metabolic homeostasis is regulated by a variety of factors, including dietary habits and light exposure. Our study aims to study whether certain wavelength of light would affect metabolic status of mice. Mice were divided into normal diet-fed group and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed group, and then exposed to various colors of the light. Physiological parameters, such as body weight, food intake and water drinking were regularly measured. Glucose tolerance test and pyruvate tolerance test were simultaneously performed. After mice were humanely sacrificed, liver histology and serologic analysis were performed for detecting lipid levels. We found that GL group showed obvious glucose intolerance and increased levels of serum and liver lipid contents compared to white light group. Meanwhile, the expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes were almost down-regulated in liver. Furthermore, melatonin receptor-1b and thyroid hormone receptor-β expression levels were significantly lowered in liver of GL-treated obese mice, suggesting that these hormone pathways may mediate the changes of lipid metabolism. Our data indicate that GL has a detrimental effect on the energy metabolism and aggravates HFD-induced obesity in mice. In addition to malnutrition, the colors of the lights also have a profound influence in the metabolic homeostasis and should be taken into consideration in the therapy of metabolic disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Green light; Hormone; Lipid metabolism; Obesity

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