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Nutrients. 2019 Apr 16;11(4). pii: E857. doi: 10.3390/nu11040857.

The Edible Insect Gryllus bimaculatus Protects against Gut-Derived Inflammatory Responses and Liver Damage in Mice after Acute Alcohol Exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Sejong 30019, Korea. poi987@korea.ac.kr.
2
Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Sejong 30019, Korea. def92@korea.ac.kr.
3
Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Sejong 30019, Korea. jinhyuplee@korea.ac.kr.
4
Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Sejong 30019, Korea. 01062033526@korea.ac.kr.
5
School of Human Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. jkk003@uark.edu.
6
School of Human Environmental Sciences, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. jhpan@uark.edu.
7
Department of Food and Biotechnology, Korea University, Sejong 30019, Korea. yk46@korea.ac.kr.
8
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Andong National University, Andong 36729, Korea. jhkim@anu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to excess alcohol exposure is a major cause of gut barrier disruption and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic inflammation, as well as liver steatosis and apoptosis. This study was designed to investigate protective effects of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, an edible insect recognized by the Korea Food and Drug Administration, against acute alcoholic liver damage in mice. Administration of G. bimaculatus extracts (GBE) attenuated alcohol-induced steatosis and apoptotic responses in the liver and intestinal permeability to bacterial endotoxin. These protective effects were associated with suppression of ROS-mediated oxidative stress in both the liver and small intestine. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed that GBE inhibits LPS-induced Kupffer cell activation and subsequent inflammatory signaling. Importantly, the protective effects of GBE were more potent than those of silymarin, a known therapeutic agent for alcoholic liver diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Gryllus bimaculatus; alcoholic liver diseases; intestinal permeability; reactive oxygen species

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