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Int J Mol Sci. 2019 Apr 16;20(8). pii: E1879. doi: 10.3390/ijms20081879.

Strategic Tools in Regenerative and Translational Dentistry.

Author information

1
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Tecnologica Research Institute, 88900 Crotone, Italy. marco.tatullo@tecnologicasrl.com.
2
Department of Experimental Medicine, Marrelli Hospital, 88900 Crotone, Italy. marco.tatullo@tecnologicasrl.com.
3
Department of Therapeutic Dentistry, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, 119435 Moscow, Russia. marco.tatullo@tecnologicasrl.com.
4
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Tecnologica Research Institute, 88900 Crotone, Italy. bruna.codispoti@tecnologicasrl.com.
5
Department of Experimental Medicine, Marrelli Hospital, 88900 Crotone, Italy. bruna.codispoti@tecnologicasrl.com.
6
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Tecnologica Research Institute, 88900 Crotone, Italy. francesco.paduano@tecnologicasrl.com.
7
Department of Experimental Medicine, Marrelli Hospital, 88900 Crotone, Italy. francesco.paduano@tecnologicasrl.com.
8
Department of NHS Foundation Trust, University Hospitals Birmingham ⁻ NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham B152GW, UK. manuelnuzzolese@libero.it.
9
Department of Therapeutic Dentistry, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, 119435 Moscow, Russia. irina.makeeva@libero.it.

Abstract

Human oral-derived stem cells can be easily obtained from several oral tissues, such as dental pulp, periodontal ligament, from gingiva, or periapical cysts. Due to their differentiation potential, oral-derived mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The regenerative ability showed by some oral tissues strongly depends on their sleeping adult stem cell populations that are able to repair small defects and to manage local inflammation. To date, researchers are working on effective and efficient methods to ensure safe and predictable protocols to translate stem cell research into human models. In the last decades, the challenge has been to finally use oral-derived stem cells together with biomaterials or scaffold-free techniques, to obtain strategic tools for regenerative and translational dentistry. This paper aims to give a clear point of view on state of the art developments, with some exciting insights into future strategies.

KEYWORDS:

dental pulp stem cells; oral-derived stem cells; regenerative medicine; tissue engineering; waste medicine

PMID:
30995738
DOI:
10.3390/ijms20081879
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