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Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol. 2019 Apr 17. doi: 10.1165/rcmb.2018-0416TR. [Epub ahead of print]

The Human Lung Cell Atlas - A high-resolution reference map of the human lung in health and disease.

Author information

1
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany, Institute of Lung Biology and Disease, Group Systems Medicine of Chronic Lung Disease and CPC-M bioArchive, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Bayern, Germany.
2
Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.
3
Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
4
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Computational Biology, Munich, Bayern, Germany.
5
University of Cambridge, Wellcome Trust/CRUK Gurdon Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
6
Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
7
Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen Deutsches Forschungszentrum fur Umwelt und Gesundheit, 9150, Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Bayern, Germany.
8
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Pathology and Medical Biology, Groningen, Netherlands.
9
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, GRIAC Research Institute, Groningen, Netherlands.
10
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergy, Beatrix Children's Hospital, Groningen, Netherlands.
11
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, GRIAC research institute, Groningen, Netherlands.
12
Northwestern University, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States.
13
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, Groningen, Netherlands.
14
University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD (GRIAC), Groningen, Netherlands.
15
Massachusetts General Hospital, 2348, Center for Regenerative Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
16
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen, Netherlands.
17
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, GRIAC research Institute, Groningen, Netherlands.
18
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany, Institute of Computational Biology, Munich, Germany.
19
Technical University of Munich, Germany, Department of Mathematics, Munich, Germany.
20
Broad Institute, 33577, Klarman Cell Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.
21
Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States.
22
Yale School of Medicine , Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Mediine , New Haven, Connecticut, United States.
23
Massachusetts General Hospital, Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, United States.
24
Northwestern University, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States.
25
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, GRIAC research institute, Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands ; m.c.nawijn@umcg.nl.

Abstract

Lung disease accounts for every sixth death globally. Profiling the molecular state of all lung cell types in health and disease is currently revolutionizing the identification of disease mechanisms and will aid the design of novel diagnostic and personalized therapeutic regimens. Recent progress in high-throughput techniques for single-cell genomic and transcriptomic analyses has opened up new possibilities to study individual cells within a tissue, classify these into cell types, and characterize variations in their molecular profiles as a function of genetics, environment, cell-cell interactions, developmental processes, ageing or disease. Integration of these cell state definitions with spatial information allows the in-depth molecular description of cellular neighborhoods and tissue microenvironments including the tissue resident structural and immune cells, the tissue matrix as well as the microbiome. The Human Cell Atlas consortium aims to characterize all cells in the healthy human body, and has prioritized lung tissue as one of the flagship projects. Here, we present the rationale, the approach and the expected impact of a Human Lung Cell Atlas.

KEYWORDS:

Human Cell Atlas; cell trajectories; single-cell RNA sequencing; spatial transcriptomics

PMID:
30995076
DOI:
10.1165/rcmb.2018-0416TR

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